Maple Leaf – Hexagon Design

Nov 6, 2018. BCD By Suzanna Couch  Maple Leaf taking shape: Amid construction, contracts also being hammered out …  The county has borrowed $12.5 million to build the performing arts center. The loan is to be paid back first by operating revenue, then by the innkeeper’s tax revenue if more is needed. Brown County visitors pay the innkeepers tax on room and cabin rentals.

A  hexagon (6-sides) design is incorporated in the building of the government-owned Maple Leaf Performing Arts Center (MLPAC) in Nashville, Indiana.

hexagram is a six-pointed geometric star figure used to refer to the compound figure of two equilateral triangles. The intersection is a regular hexagon.

Famous Hexagonal Buildings

Hexagram – Wikipedia   Hexagrams have been historically used in religious and cultural contexts and as decorative motifs; by medieval MuslimsJudaism and occultism … as a decorative motif in medieval Christian churches,  and as a religious symbol by Arabs in the medieval period.

Of local interest, a hexagram is also used in Freemasonry.  The Nashville Indiana Lodge #135 Free and Accepted Masons started in 1851

Usage in Freemasonry (Wikipedia)

  • The hexagram is featured within and on the outside of many Masonic temples as a decoration. It may have been found within the structures of King Solomon‘s temple, from which Freemasons are inspired in their philosophies and studies. Like many other symbols in Freemasonry, the deciphering of the hexagram is non-dogmatic and left to the interpretation of the individual.
  • “The interlacing triangles or deltas symbolize the union of the two principles or forces, the active and passive, male and female, pervading the universe … The two triangles, one white and the other black, interlacing, typify the mingling of apparent opposites in nature, darkness and light, error and truth, ignorance and wisdom, evil and good, throughout human life.” – Albert G. Mackey: Encyclopedia of Freemasonry

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